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News About Christian and His Reward

Christian in the Higher Regions

“Well, sir,” I said, “then I perceive you to be a well-meaning man, and so one that takes pleasure to hear and tell of that which is good: pray did you never hear what happened to a man some time ago in this town (whose name was Christian), that went on pilgrimage up towards the higher regions?”

Sagacity: Hear of him! aye, and I also heard of the molestations, troubles, wars, captivities, cries, groans, frights, and fears, that he met with and had in his journey. Besides, I must tell you, all our country rings of him; there are but few houses that have heard of him and his doings, that have sought after and got the records of his pilgrimage. Yea, I think I may say, that his hazardous journey has got a many well-wishers to his ways; for though when he was here he was fool in every man’s mouth, yet now he is gone he is highly commended of all: for ’tis said he lives bravely where he is; yea, many of them that are resolved never to run his hazards, yet have their mouths water at his gains.

“They may,” I said, “well think, if they think anything that is true, that he lives well where he is; for he now lives at and in the fountain of life, and has what he has without labour and sorrow, for there is no grief mixed therewith. But, pray, what talk have the people about him?”

Sagacity: Talk! the people talk strangely about him. Some say that he now walks in white; that he has a chain of gold about his neck; and that he has a crown of gold beset with pearls upon his head: others say that the Shining Ones that sometimes showed themselves to him in his journey are become his companions; and that he is as familiar with them in the place where he is, as here one neighbor is with another.

Besides, ’tis confidently affirmed concerning him, that the King of the place where he is has bestowed upon him already a very rich and pleasant dwelling at court; and that he every day eats and drinks, and walks and talk with him, and receives of the smiles and favors of him that is Judge of all there.

Moreover, it is expected of some, that his Prince, the Lord of that country, will shortly come into these parts, and will know the reason, if they can give any, why his neighbors set so little by him, and had him so much in derision, when they perceived that he would be a pilgrim. For they say, that now he is so in the affections of his Prince, and that his Sovereign is so much concerned with the indignities that were cast upon Christian when he became a pilgrim, that he will look upon all as if done unto himself; and no marvel, for ’twas for the love that he had to his Prince that he ventured as he did.

“I dare say,” I said. “I am glad of it; I am glad for the poor man’s sake. For that now he has rest from his labor; and for that he now reaps the benefit of his tears with joy; and for that he has got beyond the gunshot of his enemies, and is out of the reach of them that hate him.” 

I also am glad for that a rumor of these things is noised abroad in this country. Who can tell but that it may work some good effect on some that are left behind! 

Notes and Commentary

Bunyan continues his conversation with Mr. Sagacity by asking if he has heard what happened to Christian. Christian was a pilgrim who set out from the City of Destruction to journey to the Celestial City “some time ago” and it is his story that comprises Part 1 of The Pilgrim’s Progress. Bunyan hints at the popularity of Part 1 as Mr. Sagacity says of Christian, “all our country rings of him; there are but few houses that have heard of him and his doings, that have sought after and got the records of his pilgrimage.”

News of Christian’s death has spread quickly. When Christian was alive, he was mocked and scorned by many. The citizens of the City of Destruction thought him to be a fool. But now that he has gone on to his reward, “he is highly commended of all.” Even his worst critics and foes speak more kindly of him. The reality of death has stirred the town with somber thoughts: some with hope and longing, others with fear and dread.

Bunyan highlights three important lessons we can learn when confronted with the reality of death.

Continue reading notes and commentary.

The text for The Pilgrim’s Progress
and images used are public domain
Notes and Commentary for Part II ©2014, 2021 Ken Puls

Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are from 
the New King James Version (NKJV) ©1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

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