News About Christian and His Reward

Christian in the Higher Regions

“Well, sir,” I said, “then I perceive you to be a well-meaning man, and so one that takes pleasure to hear and tell of that which is good: pray did you never hear what happened to a man some time ago in this town (whose name was Christian), that went on pilgrimage up towards the higher regions?”

Sagacity: Hear of him! aye, and I also heard of the molestations, troubles, wars, captivities, cries, groans, frights, and fears, that he met with and had in his journey. Besides, I must tell you, all our country rings of him; there are but few houses that have heard of him and his doings, that have sought after and got the records of his pilgrimage. Yea, I think I may say, that his hazardous journey has got a many well-wishers to his ways; for though when he was here he was fool in every man’s mouth, yet now he is gone he is highly commended of all: for ’tis said he lives bravely where he is; yea, many of them that are resolved never to run his hazards, yet have their mouths water at his gains.

“They may,” I said, “well think, if they think anything that is true, that he lives well where he is; for he now lives at and in the fountain of life, and has what he has without labour and sorrow, for there is no grief mixed therewith. But, pray, what talk have the people about him?”

Sagacity: Talk! the people talk strangely about him. Some say that he now walks in white; that he has a chain of gold about his neck; and that he has a crown of gold beset with pearls upon his head: others say that the Shining Ones that sometimes showed themselves to him in his journey are become his companions; and that he is as familiar with them in the place where he is, as here one neighbor is with another.

Besides, ’tis confidently affirmed concerning him, that the King of the place where he is has bestowed upon him already a very rich and pleasant dwelling at court; and that he every day eats and drinks, and walks and talk with him, and receives of the smiles and favors of him that is Judge of all there.

Moreover, it is expected of some, that his Prince, the Lord of that country, will shortly come into these parts, and will know the reason, if they can give any, why his neighbors set so little by him, and had him so much in derision, when they perceived that he would be a pilgrim. For they say, that now he is so in the affections of his Prince, and that his Sovereign is so much concerned with the indignities that were cast upon Christian when he became a pilgrim, that he will look upon all as if done unto himself; and no marvel, for ’twas for the love that he had to his Prince that he ventured as he did.

“I dare say,” I said. “I am glad of it; I am glad for the poor man’s sake. For that now he has rest from his labor; and for that he now reaps the benefit of his tears with joy; and for that he has got beyond the gunshot of his enemies, and is out of the reach of them that hate him.” 

I also am glad for that a rumor of these things is noised abroad in this country. Who can tell but that it may work some good effect on some that are left behind! 

Notes and Commentary

Bunyan continues his conversation with Mr. Sagacity by asking if he has heard what happened to Christian. Christian was a pilgrim who set out from the City of Destruction to journey to the Celestial City “some time ago” and it is his story that comprises Part 1 of The Pilgrim’s Progress. Bunyan hints at the popularity of Part 1 as Mr. Sagacity says of Christian, “all our country rings of him; there are but few houses that have heard of him and his doings, that have sought after and got the records of his pilgrimage.”

News of Christian’s death has spread quickly. When Christian was alive, he was mocked and scorned by many. The citizens of the City of Destruction thought him to be a fool. But now that he has gone on to his reward, “he is highly commended of all.” Even his worst critics and foes speak more kindly of him. The reality of death has stirred the town with somber thoughts: some with hope and longing, others with fear and dread.

Bunyan highlights three important lessons we can learn when confronted with the reality of death.

Continue reading notes and commentary.

The text for The Pilgrim’s Progress
and images used are public domain
Notes and Commentary for Part II ©2014, 2021 Ken Puls

Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are from 
the New King James Version (NKJV) ©1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

Return to A Guide to John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress Part 2

Return to A Guide to John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress Main Page

Met by Mr. Sagacity

Bunyan and Mr. Sagacity

And as I was in my dream, behold, an aged gentleman came by where I lay; and because he was to go some part of the way that I was traveling, methought I got up and went with him. So as we walked, and as travelers usually do, we fell into discourse; and our talk happened to be about Christian and his travels, for thus I began with the old man:

“Sir,” said I, “what town is that there below, that lies on the left hand of our way?”

Sagacity: Then said Mr. Sagacity—for that was his name: “It is the city of Destruction; a populous place, but possessed with a very ill conditioned and idle sort of people.”

“I thought that was that city,” I said; “I went once myself through that town, and therefore know that this report you give of it is true.”

Sagacity: Too true; I wish I could speak truth in speaking better of them that dwell therein.

Notes and Commentary

As Bunyan begins to dream, he meets a fellow traveler named Mr. Sagacity. Since they are traveling the same direction, Bunyan walks with him and engages him in conversation. Their “talk happened to be about Christian and his travels.”

Mr. Sagacity represents the wisdom we need to walk through this world. Someone who is sagacious has clarity of thought, soundness of mind, and acute perception. A sage (from the Greek sophos) is known and revered for being wise. Unlike Worldly Wiseman, who offered Christian ungodly counsel in Part 1, Mr. Sagacity brings true wisdom that comes from God.

Continue reading Notes and Commentary

The text for The Pilgrim’s Progress
and images used are public domain
Notes and Commentary for Part II ©2014, 2021 Ken Puls

Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are from 
the New King James Version (NKJV) ©1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

Return to A Guide to John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress Part 2

Return to A Guide to John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress Main Page

As I Slept I Dreamed Again

As I Slept I Dreamed Again

COURTEOUS companions, some time since, to tell you my dream that I had of Christian the pilgrim, and of his dangerous journey towards the Celestial Country, was pleasant to me, and profitable to you. I told you then also what I saw concerning his wife and children, and how unwilling they were to go with him on pilgrimage: insomuch that he was forced to go on his progress without them; for he durst not run the danger of that destruction which he feared would come by staying with them in the city of Destruction: wherefore, as I then showed you, he left them and departed.

Now it hath so happened, through the multiplicity of business, that I have been much hindered and kept back from my wonted travels into those parts whence he went, and so could not till now obtain an opportunity to make further inquiry after whom he left behind, that I might give you an account of them. But having had some concerns that way of late, I went down again thitherward. Now, having taken up my lodgings in a wood about a mile off the place, as I slept I dreamed again.

Notes and Commentary

John Bunyan begins Part 2 of The Pilgrim’s Progress in a similar way to Part 1. He tells his story “in the similitude of a dream.” As the story opens we learn that it has been “some time since” Bunyan related his first dream “of Christian the pilgrim and of his dangerous journey toward the Celestial Country.” 

Bunyan began writing Part 1 while he was imprisoned for his faith. When laws were enacted in his day by the king of England that hindered the preaching of the gospel, Bunyan continued to preach and teach. He was jailed in 1660 for being a non-conformist and spent the next 12 years in prison. While he was in prison, he continued serving the church through his writing. He wrote an autobiography called Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, where he shared his own story of how God had rescued him from his sin and eventually called him to gospel ministry. He also began shaping his experience into an allegory that would later develop into The Pilgrim’s Progress.

When Bunyan was released in 1672, he set his writing aside while he resumed his pastoral ministry to his church. But in God’s providence, his freedom was short-lived. He was imprisoned again in 1675 in a prison known in his town of Bedford as the Den where he completed The Pilgrim’s Progress (Part 1). The allegory was published soon after his second release in 1678.

Following Bunyan’s second release, he returned to his home in the village of Elstow in Bedfordshire, “about a mile off” (south of) Bedford and the jail where he had been imprisoned. It was here, in his “lodgings in a wood” where he wrote “The Second Part.” Part 2 tells the story of Christian’s wife, Christiana, and their children, as they make their way from the City of Destruction to the Celestial City. It was published in 1684, “some time since” (about six years after) he published Part 1. Bunyan died in 1688 and never wrote a Part 3.

So why did Bunyan write a sequel? 

Some of the reasons are the same reasons that compel authors in our day to write a sequel.

1. Bunyan was a popular preacher and author. 

During the years he was first imprisoned (1660–1672), he published numerous pamphlets and five books, including Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners. He became very well known, especially in his willingness to suffer for the cause of Christ.

When The Pilgrims Progress was published in 1678, it was instantly popular. A second edition was published the same year. A third edition followed in 1679 and two more in 1680. At the time of Bunyan’s death the book has gone through 13 editions, selling over 100,000 copies. It became the most widely read book in the English language apart from the Bible. It and Foxe’s Book of Martyrs could be found in most homes. Bunyan went on to write at least 60 books.

2. Many were counterfeiting Bunyan’s work and writing their own continuations.

Bunyan was a popular author and so there was a demand for more. Some tried to profit from Bunyan’s success and write their own versions and sequels to The Pilgrim’s Progress. Bunyan refers to these in his introductory poem to Part 2:

“‘Tis true, some have, of late, to counterfeit
My Pilgrim, to their own my title set;
Yea, others half my name, and title too,
Have stitched to their books, to make them do.”

“But yet they, by their features, do declare
Themselves not mine to be, whose’er they are.
If such thou meet’st with, then thine only way
Before them all, is, to say out thy say”

These counterfeit works proved to be inferior, both in their prose and theology. Bunyan desired to set the record straight by writing his own sequel.

3. Bunyan had more that he wanted to say.

His first idea for a sequel was published in 1680. It was called: The Life and Death of Mr. Badman; Presented to the World in a Familiar Dialogue Between Mr. Wiseman and Mr. Attentive. It was written as a companion book to The Pilgrim’s Progress to show the end of those who remained in their sin at death.

The book was good, but it was never received as “the sequel.” It went a different direction and left some important questions unanswered. The questions that Bunyan’s readers wanted him to address were: What happened to Christian’s family? What about his wife and his four sons who stayed behind in the City of Destruction? Did they perish? Did they escape! Tell us more!

As Bunyan gained more readers and critics, their unanswered questions and criticisms compelled him to write the real sequel to the story. For Part 2 he had three main goals in mind as a writer and pastor.

1. Emphasize the importance of the family and bringing the gospel to our children. Part 1 focused more on the experience of the individual soul in salvation and sanctification.

2. Emphasize the importance of the church and how the family serves in and benefits from the ministry of a local church. Bunyan highlighted the significance of the church in Part 1 with Palace Beautiful (for the new believer) and the Delectable Mountains (for the more mature believer). In Part 2 he focuses on the journeying together in the fellowship of the church.

3. Emphasize more the joys and comforts of gospel. Some of Bunyan’s critics thought he focused too much on the dangers and warnings of Christian’s “dangerous journey” in Part 1. They argued that it was too dark and too filled with peril. In Part 2 Bunyan highlights more of the help and encouragement God gives us on the journey, especially as we journey together and benefit from the ministry of the church.

I invite you to read through Part 2 of The Pilgrim’s Progress with me as I offer my thoughts and commentary along the way. If you enjoyed Part 1, you will find Part 2 just as rich and profitable. These posts will seek to draw out a small portion of Bunyan’s insights and hopefully encourage you to search after more.

The text for The Pilgrim’s Progress and images used are public domain.
Notes and Commentary for Part 2 ©2014, 2021 Ken Puls

You can follow the journey of Christiana and her children by following my blog. You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter, or join my Pilgrim’s Progress reading group on MeWe.

You can read earlier posts from The Pilgrim’s Progress by searching the Table of Contents

Conquering Prince and Lord of Glory

Sun beams shining across a field

This 18th century hymn by Gerhard Tersteegen is a timely reminder that God is the One who rules over heaven and earth. Even in days that seem tumultuous and uncertain, God is at work accomplishing His sovereign purposes. He is the One who holds the king’s heart and “turns it wherever He wishes” (Proverbs 21:1). When God humbled the proud king of Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar glorified God and confessed:

For His dominion is an everlasting dominion,
And His kingdom is from generation to generation.
All the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing;
He does according to His will in the army of heaven
And among the inhabitants of the earth.
No one can restrain His hand
Or say to Him, “What have You done?”
(Daniel 4:34–35)

The hymn is a humble prayer addressed to God. It’s not a request that we would simply recognize God’s authority or rightly understand His sovereign right to rule. Rather, it is an entreaty that we would readily and willingly submit to God’s authority and rejoice in His conquest. Today is indeed a season of grace. May our heart’s desire resonant with the words of this hymn: 

“Come Thou King of glory, come, 
Deign to make my heart Thy home.”

The Lord said to my Lord,
“Sit at My right hand,
Till I make Your enemies Your footstool.”
The Lord shall send the rod of Your strength out of Zion.
Rule in the midst of Your enemies!
(Psalm 110:1–2)

Conquering Prince and Lord of Glory

Conquering Prince and Lord of glory,
Majesty enthroned in light;
All the heavens are bowed before Thee,
Far beyond them spreads Thy might;
Shall not I fall at Thy feet,
And my heart with rapture beat,
Now Thy glory is displayed,
Thine ere yet the worlds were made?

As I watch Thee far ascending
To the right hand of the throne,
See the host before Thee bending,
Praising Thee in sweetest tone;
Shall not I too at Thy feet
Here the angels’ strain repeat,
And rejoice that heaven doth ring
With the triumph of my King?

Power and Spirit are o’erflowing,
On me also be they poured;
Every hindrance overthrowing,
Make Thy foes Thy footstool, Lord!
Yea, let earth’s remotest end
To Thy righteous scepter bend,
Make Thy way before Thee plain,
O’er all hearts and spirits reign.

Lo! Thy presence now is filling
All the church in every place;
Fill my heart too; make me willing
In this season of Thy grace;
Come Thou King of glory, come,
Deign to make my heart Thy home,
There abide and rule alone,
As upon Thy heavenly throne!

“Conquering Prince and Lord of Glory” 
Words by Gerhard Tersteegen (1735)
Translated by Catherine Winkworth (1858)
Tune: SALZBURG
Music by Jakob Hintze (1622–1702)
Words and Music ©Public Domain

Download free sheet music (PDF), including a guitar chord charts and an arrangement of the hymn tune SALZBURG for classical guitar. 

More Hymns from History

More hymns arranged for Classical Guitar

The Theology of Time

Mechanical Clock

To everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven (Ecclesiastes 3:1).

Today marks a new beginning—New Year’s Day. All around the world people are bringing in the New Year with hopes and prayers—celebrations and resolutions. The day is a significant and yearly milestone that allows us the opportunity to stop, look back, and reassess where we have been, as well as look forward and anticipate what lies ahead. It is a special day on the calendar that closes one chapter and opens the next.

But why do we observe such days? Why do we pay so much attention to the passing of time: days and months and years—anniversaries and birthdays—celebrations and holidays? 

Our lives are driven by time. We are ever chasing after time, running out of time, and filling up time.  Our days are mapped out with schedules, appointments, and deadlines. But how should we, as followers of Christ, concern ourselves with time? Does God’s Word have anything to say about how we spend our days and months and years?

God, as we shall see, has much to say about time. 

God Himself is concerned with time. He created it and ordained it for His purposes. He appoints time and works in time, for His own glory and for our good. And He is intent that we pay attention to time and use it wisely in ways that honor Him and serve His Kingdom.

Ecclesiastes 3 begins: “To everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven” (Ecclesiastes 3:1).

In God’s design, everything in His creation, every matter under heaven—all things existing under His rule and authority—has been given a time. And that includes us. We are here for a purpose—living in this place, at this time, here in this day.

So why did God create time? What purpose does it serve in His creation? How does it do us good and bring Him glory? 

In this study I want to look briefly at how time serves both God and man in God’s creation.

God created time for our good and for His own glory.

I have three main points—three ways in which time serves God to make Him known, and serves us, to help us know God in His attributes and works.

I. Time displays the sovereignty of God and the subjection of man.

II. Time displays the eternality of God and the frailty of man.

III. Time displays the mercy of God and the need of man.

Continue reading this Bible Study

Find more sermons and articles by Ken Puls

A Guide to John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress Part 2

Christiana and family begin their journey

“Wherein is set forth the manner of the setting out of Christian’s wife and children, and safe arrival at the desired country.”

Coming February 2021

Those who know me well and those who follow my blog know that my favorite book apart from the Bible is The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan. I have read and taught Bunyan’s allegory many times. On May 21, 2013 I began publishing my commentary online: A Guide to John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress. The commentary for Part 1 was completed on July 8, 2019. I’m grateful for all who have used and benefited from my online notes, especially those who have taken time to send comments and encouragements. Since completing Part 1, many have asked about continuing the commentary with Part 2. 

I’m pleased to announce that beginning in February 2021, I will be posting my notes for Part 2 of The Pilgrim’s Progress on my website.

Please join me this coming year in following the story of Christian’s wife, Christiana, and their children, as they make their way from the City of Destruction to the Celestial City. Follow my blog (or “Ken Puls Music” on Facebook) to keep up with their journey.

Who Is This So Weak and Helpless?

Manger and Cloth

There are many well-matched hymn tunes and texts in the treasure trove of hymnody. A well-matched tune not only fits the poetic meter of the text, it helps to undergird, emotionally interpret, and express the meaning of the text. Crafting or finding music that aptly conveys and strengthens the message of the lyrics is called text painting. Examples of hymn tunes that beautifully paint the text include:

“Holy, Holy, Holy” by Reginald Heber (1783–1826) 
Set to the tune NICAEA by John B. Dykes, 1861

This hymn echoes the threefold praise of God’s holiness found in Scripture (Isaiah 6:3, Revelation 4:8). It affirms the doctrine: “God in three Persons, blessed Trinity.” The motive of the tune accompanies the words “Holy, Holy, Holy.” It consists of a rising arpeggio of the tonic chord: a major triad made up of a root, 3rd, and 5th. It is a musical illustration of the doctrine of the Trinity: 3 notes, one chord.  

“How Firm a Foundation” from John Rippon’s Selection of Hymns, 1787 
Set to the tune FOUNDATION from John Funk’s Genuine Church Music, 1832

This hymn affirms the certainty of God’s Word. All that God has said and promised will surely come to pass. The tune conveys firmness by emphasizing the structural tones of the major scale. Most of the melody consists of the three notes of the tonic triad (the most stable chord of the key). 

“O Sacred Head Now Wounded,” a Medieval Latin poem ascribed to Bernard Clairvaux (1091–1153)
Set to the tune PASSION CHORALE by Hans Leo Hassler, 1601, harmonized by J.S. Bach, 1729

Hassler’s tune in minor with Bach’s harmonization captures well the “grief,” “anguish,” and “sorrow” in the text. Bach concludes with a cadence in the relative major, as the hymn expresses both the suffering of Christ on the cross and God’s grace and love that come to us through Christ’s sacrifice.

“Up from the Grave He Arose” (Low in the Grave He Lay) 
Set to the tune CHRIST AROSE
Words and music by Robert Lowry (1826–1866)

Lowry’s hymn celebrating Christ’s resurrection begins with an 8-measure subdued verse (“Low in the grave He lay”) leading into a 12-measure triumphant chorus with dotted rhythms and expanded range. The chorus opens with an ascending arpeggio on the tonic chord interpreting the words “Up from the grave He arose.”

“Joy to the World” by Isaac Watts, 1719 
Set to the tune ANTIOCH by Lowell Mason, 1836, based on music by G.F. Handel, 1742

This familiar Christmas hymn proclaims Christ’s incarnation. The tune begins with a descending major scale conveying the text: “Joy to the world, the Lord is come.” The melody then ascends, returning to the starting note, reaching up with the words: “Let earth receive her King!”

A lesser-known Christmas hymn, whose tune beautifully portrays the text, is “Who Is This So Weak and Helpless.” This hymn begins with the birth of Christ, then points us to His life, suffering, and death on the cross. The first half of each verse focuses on Christ’s humiliation and asks the perplexing question: “Who is this?” The question is tied to the hymn’s motive that begins with the opening notes of the minor scale, rising a minor third from “a” to “c” (from tonic to mediant). The second half of each verses answers the question posed in the first half. We see Christ’s exaltation in stark contrast to His humiliation: “Who is this?” Answer: “Tis the Lord!” “Tis our God!” The motive also begins the second half of each verse, but the notes are raised a third. Now the notes rise from “c” to “e” (a major third), brightening the motive with uplifting wonder.

It seems improbable that the child who “coldly in a manger laid” is “the Lord of all creation.” It seems astounding that “a Man of Sorrows” is indeed “our God, our glorious Savior.” Yet this is the profound mystery of the incarnation. 

Below is the full text of the hymn. As you celebrate this Christmas season look from the manger to the cross and marvel at the wondrous way that God has accomplished our salvation.

“For My thoughts are not your thoughts,
Nor are your ways My ways,” says the Lord.
“For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
So are My ways higher than your ways,
And My thoughts than your thoughts.”
(Isaiah 55:8-9)

Who Is This So Weak and Helpless?

“He was in the world, and the world was made by Him, and the world knew Him not” (John 1:10).

WHO is this so weak and helpless,
Child of lowly Hebrew maid,
Rudely in a stable sheltered,
Coldly in a manger laid?
‘TIS the Lord of all creation,
Who this wondrous path hath trod;
He is God from everlasting,
And to everlasting God.

WHO is this, a Man of Sorrows,
Walking sadly life’s hard way,
Homeless, weary, sighing, weeping,
Over sin and Satan’s sway?
‘TIS our God, our glorious Savior,
Who above the starry sky
Now for us a place prepareth,
Where no tear can dim the eye.

WHO is this? Behold Him shedding
Drops of blood upon the ground!
Who is this, despised, rejected,
Mocked, insulted, beaten, bound?
‘TIS our God, who gifts and graces
On His church now poureth down;
Who shall smite in holy vengeance
All His foes beneath His throne.

WHO is this that hangeth dying
While the rude world scoffs and scorns,
Numbered with the malefactors,
Torn with nails and crowned with thorns?
‘TIS the God who ever liveth 
‘Mid the shining ones on high,
In the glorious golden city,
Reigning everlastingly.

“Who Is This So Weak and Helpless” 
Words by William Walsham How (1823–1897)
Music by John Ambrose Lloyd, the elder (1815–1874)
Words and Music ©Public Domain

Download lyrics and free sheet music (PDF), including guitar chord charts and an arrangement of the hymn tune EIFIONYDD for classical guitar. 

More Hymns from History

More Christmas hymns arranged for Classical Guitar

Songs and Thanksgiving

Open Bible and Hymn Tune

O give thanks to the Lord for He is good!
For His mercy endures forever.
(Psalm 118:1)

Below is a list of psalm settings, hymns, and spiritual songs that focus on giving thanks to the Lord.  

If you have additional suggestions for songs related to thanksgiving that should be included in the index, please comment or send me a message.

Note: The songs are listed below by title and author. For more complete entries (including tunes and hymnal page numbers) see the page for Songs and Thanksgiving in the Theological Index of Music for Worship online. I will be updating the online Index with more songs and topics in the days ahead as I receive recommendations.

Songs and Thanksgiving 

1.  It is good to give thanks to the Lord

  • All People That on Earth Do Dwell—Psalm 100 (William Kethe / Thomas Ken)
  • How Good It Is to Thank the Lord—Psalm 92:1–9, 12–15 (The Psalter, 1912)  
  • It Is Good to Sing Your Praises (The New Metrical Version of the Psalms, 1909)

2.  All people should praise and thank the Lord

  • All People That on Earth Do Dwell—Psalm 100 (William Kethe / Thomas Ken)
  • Let All Things Now Living (Katherine Davis)
  • Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart (Edward Plumptre)

3. Give thanks for who God is

  • 10,000 Reasons – Bless the Lord (Jonas Myrin / Matt Redman)
  • All People That on Earth Do Dwell—Psalm 100 (William Kethe / Thomas Ken)
  • Be Exalted, O God—Psalm 57:9–11 (Brent Chambers)
  • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing (Robert Robinson)
  • For the Beauty of the Earth (Folliott Pierpoint)
  • Forever (Chris Tomlin)
  • Great Is Thy Faithfulness (Thomas O. Chisholm)
  • How Good It Is to Thank the Lord—Psalm 92:1–9, 12–15 (The Psalter, 1912)  
  • Let All Things Now Living (Katherine Davis)
  • Let Us with a Gladsome Mind—Psalm 136 (John Milton)
  • My Heart Is Filled with Thankfulness (Stuart Townend / Keith Getty)
  • Now Thank We All Our God (Martin Rinkert / Catherine Winkworth)
  • Rejoice, the Lord Is King  (Charles Wesley)
  • With Grateful Heart My Thanks I Bring—Psalm 138 (The Psalter, 1912)

4.  Give thanks for life and daily provision

  • All People That on Earth Do Dwell—Psalm 100 (William Kethe / Thomas Ken)
  • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come (Henry Alford)
  • For the Beauty of the Earth (Folliott Pierpoint)
  • Great Is Thy Faithfulness (Thomas O. Chisholm)
  • It Is Good to Sing Your Praises (The New Metrical Version of the Psalms, 1909)
  • Let All Things Now Living (Katherine Davis)
  • Let Us with a Gladsome Mind—Psalm 136 (John Milton)
  • My Heart Is Filled with Thankfulness (Stuart Townend / Keith Getty)
  • Now Thank We All Our God (Martin Rinkert / Catherine Winkworth)

5.  Give thanks for salvation and eternal life

  • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing (Robert Robinson)
  • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come (Henry Alford)
  • Father I Thank You (Jeremy & Adrienne Camp, David & Natalie Leonard)
  • Forever (Chris Tomlin)
  • Give Thanks (Henry Smith)
  • Great Is Thy Faithfulness (Thomas O. Chisholm)
  • Jesus Thank You (Pat Sczebel)
  • My Heart Is Filled with Thankfulness (Stuart Townend / Keith Getty)
  • Rejoice, the Lord Is King  (Charles Wesley)
  • Thank You, Lord (Seth and Bessie Skies)
  • There Is a Redeemer (Melody Green)
  • With Grateful Heart My Thanks I Bring—Psalm 138 (The Psalter, 1912)
  • Worthy Is the Lamb (Darlene Zschech)

6. Begin each day with thanksgiving

  • 10,000 Reasons – Bless the Lord (Jonas Myrin / Matt Redman)
  • How Good It Is to Thank the Lord—Psalm 92:1–9, 12–15 (The Psalter, 1912)  
  • It Is Good to Sing Your Praises (The New Metrical Version of the Psalms, 1909)

7. Conclude each day with thanksgiving

  • 10,000 Reasons – Bless the Lord (Jonas Myrin / Matt Redman)
  • A Prayer for God’s Presence (Ken Puls)
  • How Good It Is to Thank the Lord—Psalm 92:1–9, 12–15 (The Psalter, 1912)  
  • It Is Good to Sing Your Praises (The New Metrical Version of the Psalms, 1909)

8.  Give thanks to the Lord in gathered worship (with the church)

  • We Bring the Sacrifice of Praise (Kirk C. Dearman) 
  • We Gather Together (Adrianas Valerius, Theodore Baker)
  • We Give Thanks (Drew Hodge) 
  • With Grateful Heart My Thanks I Bring—Psalm 138 (The Psalter, 1912)

9.  Give thanks to the Lord before a watching world

  • Be Exalted, O God—Psalm 57:9–11 (Brent Chambers) 
  • With Grateful Heart My Thanks I Bring—Psalm 138 (The Psalter, 1912)

10.  Give thanks to the Lord with joy

  • All People That on Earth Do Dwell—Psalm 100 (William Kethe / Thomas Ken)
  • He Has Made Me Glad—Psalm 100:4 (Leona Von Brethorst) 
  • How Good It Is to Thank the Lord—Psalm 92:1–9, 12–15 (The Psalter, 1912)  
  • It Is Good to Sing Your Praises (The New Metrical Version of the Psalms, 1909)
  • Let All Things Now Living (Katherine Davis)
  • Now Thank We All Our God (Martin Rinkert / Catherine Winkworth)
  • Rejoice, the Lord Is King  (Charles Wesley)
  • Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart (Edward Plumptre)
  • We Bring the Sacrifice of Praise (Kirk C. Dearman) 

11.  Give thanks to the Lord even in times of trial and sorrow

  • Blessed Be Your Name (Matt & Beth Redman)
  • Count Your Blessings (Johnson Oatman, Jr.)
  • Father I Thank You (Jeremy & Adrienne Camp, David & Natalie Leonard)
  • Now Thank We All Our God (Martin Rinkert / Catherine Winkworth)
  • Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart (Edward Plumptre)
  • With Grateful Heart My Thanks I Bring—Psalm 138 (The Psalter, 1912)

12.  Give thanks to the Lord always

  • 10,000 Reasons – Bless the Lord (Jonas Myrin / Matt Redman)
  • All People That on Earth Do Dwell—Psalm 100 (William Kethe / Thomas Ken)
  • Father I Thank You (Jeremy & Adrienne Camp, David & Natalie Leonard)
  • He Has Made Me Glad—Psalm 100:4 (Leona Von Brethorst)

For more complete entries (including tunes and hymnal page numbers) see the online Index:

Entry for “Songs and Thanksgiving”

TOC for Theology and Song: A Theological Index of Music for Worship

Thanksgiving Music for Classical Guitar

Guitar and autumn trees

“It is good to give thanks to the Lord,
And to sing praises to Your name, O Most High;
To declare Your lovingkindness in the morning,
And Your faithfulness every night,
On an instrument of ten strings,
On the lute,
And on the harp,
With harmonious sound.”
(Psalm 92:1–3)

“It is good to give thanks to the Lord.” And it is good to share and celebrate thanksgiving with music. If you play classical guitar, here are a few hymns for you to enjoy:

For the Beauty of the Earth
We Gather Together
Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing
Now Thank We All Our God
Come, Ye Thankful People, Come

You can download free sheet music for these hymns (and more) here:

Thanksgiving Music for Classical Guitar

You are welcome to copy and share these hymns with friends and fellow guitarists. You can use them for accompanying congregational singing, playing prelude or offertory music, or simply playing for your own enjoyment.  Please copy the full page with the website address and the “Used by Permission” notice at the bottom (see Permissions).

For additional music for Classical Guitar, visit:

Christmas Music for Classical Guitar

Hymns for Classical Guitar

Music of Bach for Classical Guitar

Wedding Music for Classical Guitar

Student Pieces and Music for Classical Guitar 

Music for Flute and Classical Guitar

Music for Flute and Classical Guitar

Flute and Classical Guitar

One of my favorite combinations of musical instruments is flute and classical guitar. I especially enjoy music for flute and guitar since my daughter plays the flute. She and I often play music together. Many of the duets we play are pieces I have arranged or transcribed. 

I have added to my website a few of these transcriptions and arrangements. They include music from the Baroque (Telemann and Vivaldi), folk music, and a setting for Christmas of “Cantique de Noel” (O Holy Night).

You can download any or all of the sheet music for free:

Music for Flute and Classical Guitar

Also check out:

Student Resources and Music for Classical Guitar

Hymns for Classical Guitar

Christmas Music for Classical Guitar

Wedding Music for Classical

Music of Bach for Classical Guitar 

Music and Resources for Worship